The troubadour (Henry David Leslie)

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  • (Posted 2020-07-11)  CPDL #59696:         
Editor: James Gibb (submitted 2020-07-11).   Score information: A4, 8 pages, 127 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes:

General Information

Title: The troubadour
Composer: Henry David Leslie
Lyricist: Walter Scott

Number of voices: 5vv   Voicing: SATBB
Genre: SecularPartsong

Language: English
Instruments: Piano

First published: 1885 in Novello's Part-Song Book (2nd series), Vol. 18, no. 500

Description: The lyrics are a translation by Scott of a poem by the Duchesse de St Leu.

External websites:

Original text and translations

English.png English translation

Glowing with love, on fire for fame
A troubadour that hated sorrow
Beneath his lady's window came,
And thus he sung his last good-morrow:
'My arm it is my country's right,
My heart is in my true-love's bower;
Gaily for love and fame to fight
Befits the gallant troubadour.'

And while he marched with helm on head
And harp in hand, the descant rung,
As faithful to his favourite maid,
The minstrel-burden still he sung:
'My arm it is my country's right,
My heart is in my lady's bower;
Resolved for love and fame to fight
I come, a gallant troubadour.'

Even when the battle-roar was deep,
With dauntless heart he hewed his way,
'Mid splintering lance and falchion sweep,
And still was heard his warrior lay:
'My life it is my country's right,
My heart is in my lady's bower;
For love to die, for fame to fight,
Becomes the valiant troubadour.'

Alas! upon the bloody field
He fell beneath the foeman's glaive,
But still reclining on his shield,
Expiring sung the exulting strain:
'My life it is my country's right,
My heart is in my lady's bower;
For love and fame to fall in fight
Becomes the valiant troubadour.'

Translation by Walter Scott