Acis and Galatea, HWV 49 (George Frideric Handel)

From ChoralWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Music files

L E G E N D Disclaimer How to download
ICON SOURCE
Icon_pdf.gif Pdf
Icon_zip.gif Zip file
Network.png Web Page
File details.gif File details
Question.gif Help
  • (Posted 2006-01-29)  CPDL #10037:  pp. 1-26:   pp. 27-50:   pp. 51-74:   pp. 75-100:   (MIDI)
Editor: Michael Gibson (submitted 2006-01-29).   Score information: Letter, 24 pages, 2.93 MB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes: 4 PDF Sections make up complete vocal score (page numbers at bottom, musical numbers at top of page). MIDI files are zipped. Based on Joseph Barnby's SATB rearrangement of choruses.

Excerpts

Contributor: David Newman (submitted 2008-07-23).   Score information: Letter, 7 pages, 303 kB    Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: recit. & aria for bass: "I Rage, I Melt / O Ruddier than the Cherry" Edition in G Minor, piano reduction by Ebenezer Prout

General Information

Title: Acis and Galatea, HWV 49
Composer: George Frideric Handel
Lyricists: John Gay, Alexander Pope and John Hughes

Number of voices: 5vv   Voicing: SATTB with Solo STTB
Soli:

Galatea - soprano
Acis - tenor
Damon - tenor (treble in the 1718 version)
Polyphemus - bass
Coridon - tenor (1718 only)

Genre: SecularOpera

Language: English
Instruments: Orchestra

First published:

Description: There are quite a few incarnations of this work: the serenata/cantata for 3 singers Aci, Galatea e Polifemo (HWV 72) was written in 1708. Handel wrote completely new music for the serenade/masque Acis and Galatea in 1717-18 for 5 singers (published 1722). In 1732 he made a 3 act version borrowing some music from Aci, Galatea e Polifemo as well as other Italian works (and dropping the role of Coridon), and in 1739 he reworked the 1718 version into 2 acts. The 1732 version continued to be revised through 1741. Mozart adapted the work in 1788 (K. 566).

External websites:

Original text and translations

English.png English text

Recit:
I rage, I rage, I melt, I burn!
The feeble god has stabbed me to the heart.
Thou trusty pine, prop of my god-like steps,
I lay thee by!
Bring me a hundred reeds of decent growth,
to make a pipe for my capacious mouth;
in soft enchanting accents
let me breathe sweet Galatea’s beauty, and my love.

Aria:
O ruddier than the cherry,
O sweeter than the berry,
O nymph more bright than moonshine night,
Like kidlings blithe and merry!

Ripe as the melting cluster,
No lily has such lustre;
Yet hard to tame as raging flame,
And fierce as storms that bluster!