Io vidi già sotto l'ardente sole (Luca Marenzio)

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  • (Posted 2021-05-11)  CPDL #64392:         
Editor: Gerhard Weydt (submitted 2021-05-11).   Score information: A4, 5 pages, 153 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes: Original pitch and note values.

General Information

Title: Io vidi già sotto l'ardente sole
Composer: Luca Marenzio
Lyricist: Torquato Tasso
Number of voices: 6vv   Voicing: SATTTB
Genre: SecularMadrigal

Language: Italian
Instruments: A cappella

First published: 1584 Il secondo libro de madrigali a sei voci (Luca Marenzio), no. 13
Description: 

External websites:

Original text and translations

Alfred Einstein says in his "The Italian Madrigal" (II) that this madrigal and Vita de la mia vita must have been written to order, as they have similar headings in the old editions, namely "Pallore di madonna desiato" and "Pallore di madonna grato", respectively. While the statement that they would have been written to order does not necessarily follow from that fact, they were obviously written together, and Marenzio also put them side by side in his collection.

Italian.png Italian text

Io vidi già sotto l’ardente sole
Discolorati i fiori
Come la mia Licori;
Come i gigli del volto e le viole
Che d’irrigar desio
Con lagrimoso rio,
E seco insieme impallidir anch’io,
Seco mutar sembiante,
aventuroso amante.

German.png German translation

Ich sah schon unter der brennenden Sonne
entfärbt die Blumen
so wie meine Licori;
wie die Lilien ihres Antlitzes und die Veilchen,
die zu netzen ich wünsche
mit einem tränenvollen Bach,
und gemeinsam mit ihr auch zu erblassen,
mit ihr zu ändern das Angesicht,
glücklicher Liebender.

Translation by Gerhard Weydt
English.png English translation

I already beheld, under the burning sun,
the flowers discoloured
like my Licori;
like the lilies of her face and the viols
which I wish to irrigate
by a tearful brook,
and turn pale too together with her,
to change countenance,
fortunate lover.

Translation by Gerhard Weydt